Tomra - da kan vi juble for "all-in" pantesystem i Skottland!


Ja, for etter å ha lest det jeg videreformidler her, tror jeg trygt vi kan slippe jublen løs, og vedtar skottene et "ALL-IN" PANTESYSTEM med HØYE PANTESATSER, kommer resten av Storbrtitannia (England, Nord-Irland og Wales) til å gjøre det samme. Det er for lengst uttrykt fra øverste politiske hold at hele Storbritannia vil få et samkjørt pantesystem. Det har den britiske miljøvernministeren Michael Gove sagt i klartektst. Jo større og jo mer omfattende og komplekst pantesystem, jo større blir Tomras hovedrolle. Det sier seg selv når Tomra har nær 80% global markedsandel innen pantesystemer og dette er et prestisjeprosjekt av de sjeldne for skotske og britiske myndigheter.

Zero Waste Scotland er finansiert av skotske myndigheter og oppevnt til å utforme Skottlands pantesystem. Som dere kan lese nedefor, uttaler nå Zero Waste Scotland at skotske myndigheter ønsker et "all-in" pantesystem.



3 MAY 2019 by Will Date

Local authorities ‘will benefit’ from DRS


Local authorities will overall get a net benefit from the introduction of a Deposits Return Scheme for drinks containers, according to Zero Waste Scotland which is helping plan for the introduction of the scheme north of the border.

And, plans for a deposit return scheme for drinks containers in Scotland look likely to favour a higher deposit level, and are being drawn up on an ‘all-in’ basis to encompass a wide set of materials and container sizes.

Details of the possible format of the Scottish DRS, which will be introduced ahead of similar schemes in England, Northern Ireland and Wales, were discussed at the annual conference of the Scottish branch of the Local Authority Recycling Advisory Committee in Glasgow yesterday (2 May).

The measure sees consumers pay a deposit on the purchase of a soft drink, which is recouped if the packaging is returned for recycling.

Legislation

Zero Waste Scotland, the Scottish government funded resources body, is currently drawing up the final designs for how a Scottish DRS will function ahead of the introduction of legislation for the scheme later this year.

David Barnes, programme manager for Zero Waste Scotland, told the conference that the measure in Scotland is primarily aimed at reducing litter, whilst also capturing a higher volume of drinks containers and at a higher quality than those collected at the kerbside.

Questions were raised from delegates about the cost of the measure, as well as the impact on local authority kerbside collections, and whether it would incentivise ‘picking’ from recycling bins to create an income.

Up to 20p

Mr Barnes indicated that plans are being considered for the DRS rate to be set at a level that would incentivise the purchaser to return the packaging, with a potential deposit of up to 20p per item on the table.

“From our perspective, what we are keen to do is set the deposit rate at a level that motivates the person who purchased the container to return it for recycling, not just to create an opportunity for those who are less well off to do that.”

On the materials that this is likely to cover, he suggested that an ‘all-in’ approach is favoured by the Scottish Government, meaning that it will target all container sizes and materials.

“We are looking at an all in DRS,” he said. “Scottish Government has determined that it [an on the go DRS] doesn’t deliver the step change we are looking for, it targets that narrow a proportion of the containers that it doesn’t deliver against the objectives I have described.

Income streams

On the likely impact on income streams for local authorities, he said that the loss of revenue for recyclable materials would be offset by an increase in the diversion of material away from the residual waste stream, and a reduction in the cost of managing the proportion of that waste as litter.

“In terms of the impact for local authorities, we are aware that some of the material is an income stream but there is a huge amount going to residual waste that is being treated at cost to local authorities, and actually what our modelling shows that local authorities are net beneficiaries in terms of financial savings.”

Earlier in the day the conference also heard from the Scottish Government’s head of zero waste unit Janet McVea, who also highlighted the ongoing consultation on extended producer responsibility being undertaken alongside Defra.

She said: “The aim is to incentivise and steer manufacturing choices. But, I can’t emphasise enough how much of a game changer this reform could be and the opportunities that could present for local authorities and the opportunities to support more consistent collection of materials.”

On the impact of a DRS on local authorities, Ms Vea added: “There will continue to be a need for effective kerbside collections alongside a DRS and we will continue to work with local government as implementation plans progress.”

https://www.letsrecycle.com/news/latest-news/councils-benefit-drs/
Redigert 06.05.2019 kl 18:22 Du må logge inn for å svare

Home Industry News

TOMRA and Co-op launch deposit return scheme for festival-goers

by Grace Nolan
2 July 2019 09:52


TOMRA has teamed up with Co-op to launch a fully functional deposit return scheme (DRS) trial with RVMs at Co-op’s pop-up stores at seven major UK music festivals.

The link-up saw machines at Download and Isle of Wight festivals in June, and will see them at Latitude in July, and Creamfields, Belladrum, Reading and Leeds in August.

Festival-goers will pay a mandatory 10p deposit when they buy plastic bottles of up to two litres in size at Co-op pop-up stores. They can then use the machines located in a ‘recycling room’ within the pop-ups to return their empty bottles for recycling and get their deposit back in the form of a voucher to spend in the on-site stores.

Alternatively, they can choose to donate their 10p to Keep Britain Tidy and any unclaimed deposits will also be donated to the nominated charity.

Truls Haug, Managing Director of TOMRA Collection Solutions UK & Ireland, said: “Ahead of the formal introduction of a Deposit Return Scheme in Scotland and the rest of the UK, this represents a great opportunity for music fans to experience for themselves the ease and simplicity of reverse vending and deposit return.

“We are delighted to be supporting these great events and to have the chance to boost their sustainability credentials, while hopefully promoting good recycling habits for the future.

TOMRA has already operated a number of deposit return trials with retailers across the UK and is ready to assist businesses as they prepare themselves for the introduction of a DRS.

https://www.britishplastics.co.uk/News/tomra-and-co-op-launch-deposit-return-scheme-for-festival-go/

HOME

The BIG Plastics Debate puts plastic alternatives under the microscope

13 AUGUST 2019


Experts from some of the world’s biggest brands, including Carlsberg, LUSH Cosmetics, and Just Eat, will come together at Packaging Innovations and Luxury Packaging London 2019 to debate the industry’s hottest topic – sustainability. With plastic no longer king of the packaging arena, the show’s headline feature will welcome an array of industry experts to discuss the alternatives to traditional plastic and take a critical view of their green credentials.

The debate will take place across both days of the event, which returns to Olympia on 11 & 12 September. Kicking off day one will be Jill Farrell, Chief Operating Officer at Zero Waste Scotland, who will discuss the Scottish Government’s Deposit Return Scheme (DRS). The DRS system has been implemented in the country to assist it in reaching its target of 70 percent recycling levels and 5 percent maximum waste to landfill by 2025. The talk will also explore how this method could be adopted by Westminster.

https://packagingeurope.com/the-big-plastics-debate-puts-plastic-alternatives-under-the-/



Scots say glass should be in 20p deposit return scheme

Circular Economy, Collection and Transport, Environment and Energy, Policy and Strategy, Resource Management, Scotland

22nd August 2019


The vast majority (85%) of people in Scotland say that glass should be included in Scotland’s 20p deposit return scheme (DRS), according to new figures released by Zero Waste Scotland today (22 August).
A YouGov survey commissioned by Zero Waste Scotland shows that 85% of people in Scotland say glass bottles should be in the scheme. In stark contrast, a mere 8% say it should not be included.

Under the recycling scheme, people will pay a 20p deposit when buying drinks in a plastic or glass bottle or a metal can. They will get their money back when they return them to be recycled*.

The polling is published by Zero Waste Scotland alongside new online content for stakeholders that helps to make clear the benefits of including glass in the scheme.

...

Leading schemes in Germany, Finland, Denmark and Estonia successfully incorporate glass.

Jill Farrell, Chief Operating Officer, Zero Waste Scotland, said: “The environmental evidence shows why Scotland is right to include glass in its deposit return scheme from day one.

“People in Scotland want glass to be included in Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme as part of ambitious action to protect our environment. The carbon emissions savings make it clear that they are right.

“Every bottle recycled rather than sent to landfill means carbon savings. At a time of a climate emergency, this is an unmissable opportunity to cut tens of thousands of tonnes of carbon.”

Mark Hazell, Founder of Jaw Brew, said: “Glass bottles are a big part of our business – after all, it’s how most people buy our beer. We want to see as much of that glass recycled as possible and the 20p deposit on glass bottles will help make that happen.

“Jaw Brew has always put the environment at the core of what we do so anything that helps make our materials more sustainable is a definite plus for us. I lived in Germany for many years so saw how successful deposit return schemes can be and it’s great that Scotland is set to introduce its own scheme.”

https://www.circularonline.co.uk/news/scots-say-glass-should-be-in-20p-deposit-return-scheme/


Folkelig entusiasme dokumenteres nåår det gjelder skottenes kommende pantesystem.



4 in 5 Scots back a 20p deposit return scheme

Circular Economy, Collection and Transport, Environment and Energy, Policy and Strategy, Scotland, Sustainability

2nd September 2019


Scotland’s deposit return scheme will make it easy for people to “do something good” for the environment, says Zero Waste Scotland.
A YouGov survey commissioned by Zero Waste Scotland shows that nearly four in five (77%) people in Scotland support the introduction of Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme – and helping the environment is among their top motivations (72%).

The recycling scheme will see a 20p deposit placed on single-use drinks containers. People will get their cash back when they take the empty back to be recycled and that financial incentive is expected to see 90% of bottles and cans captured for recycling.

That boost to recycling will reduce Scotland’s CO2e emissions by an estimated 160,000 tonnes every year. That means that people will be playing a part in Scotland’s response to the climate emergency with every bottle or can they return.

The poll also reveals what will motivate people when using the scheme. The figures suggest that helping the environment will be at the forefront of people’s minds.

72% of people said that helping the environment would be a motivating factor for returning their empty drinks containers, while 70% said reducing litter in Scotland.

People will be able to return their empty bottles and cans to anywhere that sells drinks to take away – including newsagents, supermarkets and many cafes and takeaways. Having a wide network of return points will make sure the scheme is accessible and will make returning your empty bottle or can as simple as it was to buy the drink in the first place.

Iain Gulland, chief executive, Zero Waste Scotland, said: “Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme will make it easy for people to do something good for the environment.

“People in Scotland are more environmentally aware than ever before but it can be hard to know how to respond to something as monumental as the climate emergency at an individual level. This scheme will give them an action they can do week in and week out to help cut Scotland’s carbon footprint.

“By taking back your empty bottle or can, you won’t just get your 20p back. You’ll also be reducing the amount of raw materials that are used to make bottles and cans.

“That means you’ll be playing a part in Scotland’s response to the climate emergency every single time you take your bottle or can back to be recycled.”

Roseanna Cunningham, Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform, said:“I am pleased, but not surprised, to see the strength of support for Scotland’s Deposit Return scheme, with its multiple environmental benefits a key factor.

“We all – governments, businesses, communities and individuals – have a role to play in ending Scotland’s contribution to climate change. As well as giving everyone renewed incentive to reduce litter and tackling our throwaway culture, our ambitious Deposit Return Scheme will give the people of Scotland a simple yet effective way to help reduce carbon emissions, by reducing the volume of raw materials being used and instead supporting a thriving, circular economy.”

https://www.circularonline.co.uk/news/four-in-five-scots-back-a-20p-deposit-return-scheme/



Skottenes kommende pantesystem er en helt sentral byggestein innen Skottlands omlegging til sirkulær økonomi.



SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT TO TABLE A CIRCULAR ECONOMY BILL

By Imogen Benson | 4 September 2019 |


Scotland’s 2019/20 Programme for Government was published yesterday (3 September) setting out plans to tackle climate change and drive progress towards net zero carbon emissions by 2045.

The programme outlined Scotland’s plans for a new Circular Economy Bill, which aims to change attitudes towards waste and tackle the country’s throw-away culture.

...

The programme places Scotland’s plans for its deposit return scheme (DRS), set to be introduced in 2021, at the heart of its efforts to reduce waste. The DRS aims to increase recycling rates through placing a 20 pence fee on top of the cost of drinks containers, which can then be recouped when the container is returned for recycling.

Although Scotland’s upcoming DRS has been met with a mixed response from the waste industry, with critics suggesting that the scheme will negatively impact kerbside collections, the Scottish Government claim that the DRS will reduce the £46 million spent each year on litter removal and will achieve carbon savings equivalent to taking 85,000 cars off the roads.

https://resource.co/article/scottish-government-table-circular-economy-bill
wwbwb
10.09.2019 kl 12:12 557

SKOTTLAND:LOVFORSLAG OM PANTEORDNING SENDT PÅ HØRING
Oslo (TDN Direkt): Lovforslaget om Skottlands panteordning er nå ferdig og har blitt sendt til høring, ifølge en melding fra skotske myndigheter tirsdag.
Skotske myndigheter la i mai frem et forslag om nye reguleringer som vil gi pant på 20 pence for metallbokser, glassflasker samt drikkebeholdere av plast. (TDN Direkt-artikkel 08.05.2019)
PSP, finans@tdn.no
TDN Direkt, +47 21 95 60 70

Her er hele herligheten TDN Finans viser til wwbwb. Altså dagens ferske melding fra den skotske regjeringen.

Har skrevet det før, men gjentar mer enn gjerne at skottenes ambisiøse pantesystem vil sette et fantastisk eksempel for resten av Storbritannia og nasjonene i EU når disse skal designe sine pantesystemer. På bakgrunn av den skotske regjeringens skyhøye ambisjonsnivå når det gjelder dette pantesystemet, ser jeg ingen andre aktuelle kandidater til hovedrollen enn Tomra Systems når systemet skal bygges og opereres.



Scottish Government

NEWS

Deposit Return Scheme

Published: 10 Sep 2019 10:04

Part of: Environment and climate change
Ambitious scheme takes shape.


Legislation to establish Scotland’s Deposit Return Scheme has been brought forward for public comment.

The new regulations will see the establishment of a scheme that will include aluminium and steel cans as well as drinks containers made of glass and PET plastic with a 20p deposit.

By increasing both the amount and quality of this material being recycled and reducing litter, the system will help to combat climate change as well as offering benefits to industry and the public.

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said:

“Our Deposit Return Scheme is the first national scheme of its type in the UK. It is ambitious in scale and scope, and gives the people of Scotland a clear and straightforward way to do their bit for the environment.

“Research has shown that the scheme is anticipated to reduce the £46 million spent each year on litter removal and is expected to reduce emissions equivalent to taking 85,000 cars off our roads, while also enjoying widespread public support across Scotland.

“There is a global climate emergency which demands we show ambition to tackle it and safeguard our planet for future generations. This process will enable us to fine tune our proposals to ensure that they work well for industry, retail and the public, and we will continue to work with the Implementation Advisory Group to that end. I am delighted to confirm that the regulations required to bring our Deposit Return Scheme into reality have now been laid.”

Iain Gulland, Chief Executive, Zero Waste Scotland:

“These regulations put Scotland on track to deliver a world class deposit return scheme. Placing a 20p deposit on drinks bottles and cans shows that these materials have a value to our economy, and a cost to our climate if they are wasted.

“That 20p incentive will boost recycling and cut Scotland’s CO2e emissions, playing a part in the fightback against the climate emergency. It's little wonder that nearly four in five Scots support it. With drinks producers given the opportunity to group together to deliver the scheme, they can lead this exciting step towards a more circular economy.”

Background

The regulations will operate under the super affirmative process and a copy of the Regulations has been published in accordance with the enabling powers in the Climate Change Act (Scotland) Act 2009. These will be available for comment by parliament and the general public until 10 December 2019.

The Scottish Government will continue to work with the Independent Advisory Group in developing our Deposit Return Scheme proposals, and will consider any representations made before bringing forward a final set of Regulations for the normal affirmative procedure, including a vote in the Scottish Parliament.

A recent survey by Zero Waste Scotland showed strong public support for the scheme, including the inclusion of glass.

https://www.gov.scot/news/deposit-return-scheme-1/
Redigert 10.09.2019 kl 12:54 Du må logge inn for å svare

Her er mer. Blant annet får vi vite at dato for oppstart av systemet er satt til 1.april 2021.



10 SEPTEMBER 2019 by Will Date

Ministers outline Scottish DRS legislation

Scottish ministers have published draft legislation for the establishment of the Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) in the country, with an expected start date of 1 April 2021.


As previously reported, Scotland’s DRS plans centre on an ‘all-in’ model which will include all PET plastic drinks bottles, aluminium and steel cans and glass bottles – with a deposit level set at 20p

The draft legislation was published today, and stakeholders have been given until 10 December 2019 to comment on the proposals.

Support

The Scottish Government claims that there is broad support for its DRS plans, but concerns have been raised by the glass industry over the inclusion of the material in a deposit scheme, and how this could impact recycling rates for glass (see letsrecycle.com story).

It is believed that, while much of the material targeted through a DRS is captured through existing kerbside services, a DRS would help to boost capture rates and potentially improve the quality of material collected.

Primarily impacting retailers, businesses such as pubs and restaurants will be able to choose whether they apply the deposit, while online retailers will also be included in the scheme.

The legislation will allow non-retail spaces such as recycling centres, schools or other community hubs to act as return locations.

Bigger retailers with more space may install machines to both collect the bottles and cans and enable people to redeem deposits, while smaller retailers with less space have the option to return deposits over the counter, collecting the containers manually.

Target

Under the legislation, producers will be required to collect a target percentage of the packaging they place onto the market in a calendar year, by collecting their own scheme packaging from retailers and return points, and accepting the return of their scheme packaging from wholesalers. Producers will reimburse deposits for any packaging returned or collected.

Commenting on the plans Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham, said: “Our Deposit Return Scheme is the first national scheme of its type in the UK. It is ambitious in scale and scope, and gives the people of Scotland a clear and straightforward way to do their bit for the environment.

“Research has shown that the scheme is anticipated to reduce the £46 million spent each year on litter removal and is expected to reduce emissions equivalent to taking 85,000 cars off our roads, while also enjoying widespread public support across Scotland.

“There is a global climate emergency which demands we show ambition to tackle it and safeguard our planet for future generations. This process will enable us to fine tune our proposals to ensure that they work well for industry, retail and the public, and we will continue to work with the Implementation Advisory Group to that end. I am delighted to confirm that the regulations required to bring our Deposit Return Scheme into reality have now been laid.”

Value

Iain Gulland, chief executive, Zero Waste Scotland, added: “These regulations put Scotland on track to deliver a world class deposit return scheme. Placing a 20p deposit on drinks bottles and cans shows that these materials have a value to our economy, and a cost to our climate if they are wasted.

“That 20p incentive will boost recycling and cut Scotland’s CO2e emissions, playing a part in the fightback against the climate emergency. It’s little wonder that nearly four in five Scots support it. With drinks producers given the opportunity to group together to deliver the scheme, they can lead this exciting step towards a more circular economy.”

https://www.letsrecycle.com/news/latest-news/ministers-outline-scottish-drs-legislation/

Redigert 10.09.2019 kl 13:13 Du må logge inn for å svare

Innlegget er slettet av Dikteren

Blue Planet cameraman toasts Scotland’s role in tackling single-use plastics

16th Sep 19


Doug Allan said the Scottish Government is ‘ahead of the curve’ in taking on the issue.

Scotland is ahead of England in terms of tackling the issue of single-use plastics, one of two big problems facing the planet, according to an award-winning wildlife cameraman.
Doug Allan, originally from Dunfermline, Fife, has travelled the world working on TV series including Blue Planet and Frozen Planet.

The Scottish Government has made a commitment to ban plastic straws by the end of the year, while also introducing a deposit return scheme for some drinks containers.

Speaking to the PA news agency before another trip to the Arctic to film, the 68-year-old, who now lives in England, said the devolved Government in his homeland is “ahead of the curve”.

He said: “We’ve got two big issues that have been highlights recently.

“David Attenborough in Blue Planet 2 undoubtedly brought plastics to the forefront, which was a huge thing that needed to be done.

“There are now Government initiatives to stop so much waste but also to develop new plastics, which will be totally biodegradable or totally recyclable so that we don’t end up just ditching so much.

“The Scottish Government in particular are ahead of the curve in terms of bringing in bottle deposits all that sort of thing and banning single-use plastics, straws. Scotland are ahead of England in that respect.”

He added: “Now we’ve finally begun to become aware of climate change, which in its way is the biggest issue facing the planet because it’s going to affect all of us and every environment that we know of.

“It may be the UK sitting where it does between 45-55 degrees north that has always had a variable climate we can maybe cope with some of it but I don’t know how we cope with sea level rises, which could be a long-term problem.”

Initially a diver, Mr Allan discovered photography after “a chance meeting with David Attenborough” in 1981 before going on to win five Baftas and four Emmys, among other industry awards.

The cameraman also praised Scotland when comparing its seas to the cleanliness of other areas he has travelled to.

He said: “This whole business of sustainability, the state of the world’s seas and how clean or otherwise they are is a really big issue at the moment.

“I’ve seen climate change at work, seen the effects of plastic pollution and also seen just how good looking after the sea is for the whole general situation.

“Luckily Scotland’s seas are still doing very well generally, although there are shifts and baselines here and there.

“It’s hard to get an overall picture of something as big as the oceans.”

He added: “There’s all kinds of good people doing good things.

“I’m taking advantage of opportunities I get now in all kinds of ways to get something of the message out about the importance of the seas and how we should be connecting to the seas, to the natural environment, how we rely on it.

“I think it’s only when people know that they all begin to want to protect it so that it does get protected.

“We need to let people know what’s happening, in a not-wagging-the-finger type way, but we need to show them how so much depends on the sea.”

Mr Allan has also been revealed as an ambassador for Old Pulteney whisky, based in Wick, and its Rise With The Tide Campaign.

He said: “I like to get my messages out in all sorts of media and I see Old Pulteney promotion as being another route into spreading the word about how important it is to look after our seas.

“In terms of my own filming I’m trying to get involved with films about issues like climate change and trying to raise money for a film about climate change in the arctic because that is an area I am very familiar with.

“I also have another film in development about the conservation of whales from a climate change point of view but the fact the Japanese have started to commercially whale again.

“That message is important, there’s lots of different ways to carry it out there.”

© Press Association 2019

https://www.virginmediatelevision.ie/xpose/article/entertainment-news/293847/Blue-Planet-cameraman-toasts-Scotlands-role-in-tackling-singleuse-plastics
Redigert 16.09.2019 kl 22:08 Du må logge inn for å svare

Big, big BREAKING NEWS fra Skottland i dag.

Ekstremt gledelige Tomra-nyheter fra Skottland hvor det ikke har manglet på forsøk far industrihold på "å vanne ut" pantesystemet samt forsøk på å få det utsatt. Selv om høringen når det gjelder systemet fortsetter frem til 10.desember, bekreftes det allerede i dag at systemet blir i tråd med regjeringens forslag. Alle "single-use" flasker blir en del av pantesystemet, også glassflakser, og systemet skal som planlagt gå live 1.april 2021!

Jeg er 110% sikker på at Tomra går for og lykkes med å innta den store hovedrollen i dette skotske pantesystemet. Dette systemet blir nemlig den store, flotte, "state of the art" utstillingsvinduet når pantesystemer etterhvert skal opp og gå i resten av Storbritannia og landene i EU. Det er noe den skotske regjeringen også ønsker, i like høy grad som Tomra. Derfor går regjeringen selvsagt for det beste. Mark my words og vent og se. :)



Deposit return is coming in 2021

1 October 2019

No automatic exemptions for small stores, glass included, 18 months to go and one more chance to have your say


DEPOSIT return is set to go live on 1 April 2021.

New regulations published by the Scottish Government outline how DRS will work in Scotland.

While still subject to a consultation, the draft regulations are consistent with the Scottish Government’s established positions on a range of measures which have come under heavy fire from industry.

Under the proposed regulations, a 20p deposit will be applied to single-use PET bottles, aluminium cans and glass bottles. This will apply to drinks containers between 50ml and 3L in size.

Earlier this year, Scottish Grocer revealed that all industry members of the Scottish Government’s DRS Implementation Advisory Group (IAG) objected to including glass in the system.

Despite concerns raised by trade associations, including the Scottish Grocers Federation (SGF), the Scottish Retail Consortium and the Scottish Wholesale Association (SWA), all retailers who sell single-use drinks containers will be obliged to participate in the scheme – although the regulations do give ministers the power to grant some exemptions.

Stores can be given an exemption if there is an alternative return point close by that has agreed to accept returns on the retailer’s behalf. Those retailers who fail to implement DRS without an exemption could face a fine of up to £10,000.

At the collection end of DRS, the scheme will be operated by a ‘scheme administrator’ funded and operated by drinks producers.

Should the proposed regulations become law, the producer-operated scheme administrator will need to meet targets set by the Scottish Government: recovering 70% of packaging in year one; 80% in year two; and 90% in year three.

Once DRS goes live, all producers and suppliers selling drinks in Scotland will need to be registered with the Scottish Environment Protection Agency, which has been tasked with ensuring compliance among retailers and drinks companies.

The SGF welcomed that small stores will be able to apply for an exemption, but also restated its opposition to the inclusion of glass in the scheme.

SGF head of public policy and public affairs, Dr John Lee said: “The inclusion of glass will be bad for the scheme overall and for convenience stores in particular. Glass is heavy, liable to break and takes up considerable space. It will also drastically reduce the number of stores which can use automated take back. The convenience sector needs a united front on saying no to glass.”

Colin Smith, chief executive of the SWA was also critical of including glass in the scheme, as well as a “lack of recognition” of the “substantial additional costs” that Scottish wholesale businesses will face.

Smith said: “The Scottish Government’s DRS regulations now give the SWA and our members clarity about the scheme and an understanding of the serious impacts facing our members.

“But despite our regular and substantial input into the DRS Implementation Advisory Group, we are disappointed that there is no mitigation for, or handling fee, to recognise the substantial additional costs and cross-border logistics that will impact on our members’ businesses.

“Additional initial weekly cash-flow requirements will run into the hundreds of thousands of pounds for each member – one truck of drinks cans will cost an additional £14,000 alone.”

Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said: “Our deposit return scheme is the first national scheme of its type in the UK. It is ambitious in scale and scope, and gives the people of Scotland a clear and straightforward way to do their bit for the environment.

“Research has shown that the scheme is anticipated to reduce the £46 million spent each year on litter removal and is expected to reduce emissions equivalent to taking 85,000 cars off our roads, while also enjoying widespread public support across Scotland.

“There is a global climate emergency which demands we show ambition to tackle it and safeguard our planet for future generations.

“This process will enable us to fine tune our proposals to ensure that they work well for industry, retail and the public, and we will continue to work with the Implementation Advisory Group to that end.”

• Retailers can still have their say on DRS. The deadline for submissions on the Scottish Government’s DRS consultation is 10 December.

https://www.scottishgrocer.co.uk/2019/10/01/deposit-return-is-coming-in-2021/